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  1. 21 de mar. de 2024 · The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, American western film, released in 1962, that was John Ford’s poetic and sombre look at the end of the Wild West era. Although atypical of his usual works, it is widely considered Ford’s last great movie and among his best westerns. The story opens with the return.

  2. Hace 4 días · Questions arise when Senator Stoddard (James Stewart) attends the funeral of a local man named Tom Doniphon (John Wayne) in a small Western town. Flashing ba...

  3. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › John_FordJohn Ford - Wikipedia

    Hace 4 días · On The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Ford ran through a scene with Edmond O'Brien and ended by drooping his hand over a railing. O'Brien noticed this but deliberately ignored it, placing his hand on the railing instead; Ford would not explicitly correct him and he reportedly made O'Brien play the scene forty-two times before the ...

  4. Hace 1 día · Doniphon, though, waits in the shadows and shoots Valance with deadly accuracy at the exact moment Ranse fires a wild shot. Townsfolk assume Ranse is the man who shot Liberty Valance: he moves onward and upward politically, becoming governor, senator, and ambassador, with a nomination as vice president in the works.

  5. 10 de abr. de 2024 · "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" repeatedly proves that Westerns are literary by nature, if only by their depth and range of literary devices. Ford is known for shooting his pictures on location -- most famously in Monument Valley. But this one he shot largely on soundstages.

  6. 10 de abr. de 2024 · “There is a famous line in the lm The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance that says: ‘When the legend becomes fact, print the legend,’” he says. “In Bob Jones’ case, the truth continues to outdistance the legend, because he was a 24/7 hero.

  7. 27 de mar. de 2024 · The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance —intentionally shot in black and white when color was available—is a meditation on the role of the Wild West in the American imagination and the genre...